Nature's Attack

by SN creations

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A natural disaster is the consequence of a natural hazard (e.g. volcanic eruption, earthquake, tsunami or hurricanes) which affects human activities. Human vulnerability, exacerbated by the lack of planning or appropriate emergency management, leads to financial, environmental or human losses. The resulting loss depends on the capacity of the population to support or resist the disaster, and their resilience. This understanding is concentrated in the formulation: "disasters occur when hazards meet vulnerability". A natural hazard will hence never result in a natural disaster in areas without vulnerability, e.g. strong earthquakes in uninhabited areas. The term natural has consequently been disputed because the events simply are not hazards or disasters without human involvement.

 

Causes :

Natural disasters are caused by soil erosion, seismic activity, air pressure, and ocean currents. These natural events have occurred since the the earth began forming and continue to cause serious damage and loss of life all over the globe. the root causes of many of the natural disasters that occur on earth can be attributed to the four factors mentioned above.

 

Soil erosion is a naturally occurring event caused by rain and wind. Soil erosion washes away soil and rocks in lower lying areas of the earth's surface which can be effected by by floods. Soil erosion is responsible for many floods that have taken place throughout the world.

 

Seismic activity caused by earth quakes have been the root cause of volcanoes erupting and typhoons. The continents sit on hug plates that occasionally shift. When these plates shift they cause an increase in pressure underneath the earths surface. In areas where volcanoes have formed by solidified magma, pressure from gasses and magma can explode or erupt to send tons of ash into the atmosphere.

The famous ancient city of Pompeii was completely buried in this manner. Volcanoes are often formed along the lines of active plate margins. Underneath the ocean magma arises from within the earth's mantle and add to the edges of plates that are in collision. This causes earthquakes, which in turn brings about a tsunami, or giant tidal wave.

 

Changing ocean currents can result in changes of water temperature which could result in a global food shortage by killing fish and ocean plant life. The currents could also adversely effect the intensity and frequency of storms. Tornadoes are often formed by the interaction of high and low pressure air. Tornadoes have decimated many communities in an area of America known as, Tornado Alley.

 

Air pressure, high and low determine whether or not we have thunderstorms, rain and hurricanes. Flooding and high winds are caused by the crashing together of low and high pressure air. Damage caused by flooding and hurricanes along coastal cities and towns can be insurmountable for their victims.

 

Natural disasters have their root causes in the normal activities of the earth. In recent generations however, man's increased knowledge and technology has served to trigger some natural disasters. Flooding and erosion can occur in areas where mining, deforestation, and manufacturing have taken place. Global warming, which could eventually effect the ocean currents, has its roots in modern man's overuse of fossil fuels. Earthquakes can be triggered by drilling, bombing, mining, and construction.

 

 

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Natural Disasters are naturally occurring events which can directly or indirectly cause severe threats to public health and/or well-being.  Because they are naturally occurring natural disasters pose an ever present threat which can only be dealt with through proper planning and preparedness. Information on the major sources of natural disasters have been provided here to help educate the public on their cause and effects as they relate to emergency planning.

Avalanches
Avalanches

Speeding Snow

While avalanches are sudden, the warning signs are almost always numerous before they let loose. Yet in 90 percent of avalanche incidents, the snow slides are triggered by the victim or someone in the victim's party. Avalanches kill more than 150 people worldwide each year. Most are snowmobilers, skiers, and snowboarders.

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Hurricanes
Hurricanes

Engines of Destruction

Hurricanes are giant, spiraling tropical storms that can pack wind speeds of over 160 miles (257 kilometers) an hour and unleash more than 2.4 trillion gallons (9 trillion liters) of rain a day. These same tropical storms are known as cyclones in the northern Indian Ocean and Bay of Bengal, and as typhoons in the western Pacific Ocean.

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Tornadoes
Tornadoes

Killer Wind Funnels

Tornadoes are vertical funnels of rapidly spinning air. Their winds may top 250 miles (400 kilometers) an hour and can clear-cut a pathway a mile (1.6 kilometers) wide and 50 miles (80 kilometers) long.

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Earthquakes
Earthquakes

Seismic Destruction

Earthquakes, also called temblors, can be so tremendously destructive, it’s hard to imagine they occur by the thousands every day around the world, usually in the form of small tremors.

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Lightning
Lightning

Lightning Can Strike Twice

Contrary to the common expression, lightning can and often does strike the same place twice, especially tall buildings or exposed mountaintops. Cloud-to-ground lightning bolts are a common phenomenon—about 100 strike Earth’s surface every single second—yet their power is extraordinary. Each bolt can contain up to one billion volts of electricity.

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Tsunami
Tsunami

Killer Waves

The most infamous tsunami of modern times hit Indian Ocean shorelines on the day after Christmas 2004. That tsunami is believed to have packed the energy of 23,000 Hiroshima-type atomic bombs. Some 150,000 people were killed in a single day.

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43 Disasters of over 100,000 Deaths
Number of Deaths
Disaster Type
1 - Worldwide, every year
2 to 5 million a year
Malaria
2 - Western Hemisphere, mostly 16th - 18th centuries
unknown millions
European Sicknesses
3 - Africa, 1981 - 1984 unknown millions Drought
4 - World-wide, 1918 - 19 35 to 100 million
Influenza pandemic
5 - Europe and beyond, 1347-1350 25 million
Bubonic plague
6 - China, 1958 - 61 20 million
Famine
7 - India, 1769 10 million
Famine
8 - China, 1876 - 1879 9 million
Drought
9 - North Korea, 1995-98 3 million + Famine and Floods
10 - China, 1935 2 million + ?
Flood
11 - Egypt and Syria, 1201 1.1 million
Earthquake
12 - Ireland, 1845 - 48 1 million +
Famine
13 - China, 1942 - 1943 1 million +
Drought
14 - China, 1887 900,000
Flood
15 - China, 1556 830,000
Earthquake
16 - China, 1976 600,000
Earthquake
17 - China, 1920 500,000 +
Drought
18 - France, Germany, America, etc., 1870 500,000
Smallpox
19 - Bangladesh, 1970 500,000
Floods
20 - World-wide, 1957
400,000 ?
"Asian Flu"
21 - India, 1737 300,000
Typhoon
22 - China, 1642 300,000
Flood
23 - South Asia, 2004
283,106
Tsunami / Earthquake
24 - Syria, Aleppo, 1138
230,000
Earthquake
25 - Iran, 1780 200,000
Earthquake
26 - China, 1920 200,000
Earthquake
27 - China, 1927 200,000
Earthquake
28 - China, 1939 200,000
Flood
29 - Japan, 1923 170,000
Earthquake
30 - China, 1931 150,000 +
Flood
31 - China, 1933 140,000
Flood
32 - Bangladesh, 1991
139,000
Earthquake
33 - Japan, 1730 137,000
Earthquake
34 - North America, 1775-82
130,000
Smallpox
35 - Italy, 1908 123,000
Earthquake
36 - Turkmensistan (USSR), 1948
110,000
Earthquake
37 - Armenia, 1988
100,000 +
Earthquake
38 - Japan
100,000 +
Famine
39 - China,  1290
100,000 +
Earthquake
40 - Netherlands, 1228
100,000 +
Flooding from broken dykes
41 - England, 1665
100,000 +
Plague
42 - Portugal, 1775
100,000 +
Tsunami / Earthquake
43 - Vietnam, 1971
100,000 +
Flood